TCE IS Built for Meaningful Fun!    

HANDS-ON 

Children choose from hundreds of options they find FUN — bottle-feed a newborn calf, harvest salad from the garden, collect eggs, run and play on the wide lawn, explore in the forest, laugh and sing at the campfire.  We work and play shoulder to shoulder, contributing members of the farm.

Real-World Tools 

True-life tasks with real tools: a spade or wheelbarrow in the garden to plant and harvest, saws and hammers to build, a bucket or haybale in the pastures to feed animals, a skillet or whisk in the kitchen to prepare meals. 

Inside the Fences 

No demo farm, children learn how to be safe–in the kitchen, around each animal, and using various tools–then climb ‘inside the fences’ themselves!  Whether to check rabbit health, feed sheep, groom donkeys, socialize and weigh newborn goats– children quickly demonstrate responsibility with this earned trust.  

 

Want to know more?  Please give us a call or email anytime to answer questions or decide if TCE is a fit for your family.  Ed@thecountryexperience.com, 312-852-7400


Cabins and Meals

A Typical Day

The Farm

Rates and Dates


Apply To Camp


So, what exactly does a camper get to do?  Every day we choose from hundreds of activities, taken from the real-life needs and opportunities of the farm – checking on the rabbits, picking berries, collecting eggs, preparing a meal, repairing a fence, feeding the goats, building in the woodshop, playing on the lawn and in the pastures. Importantly, campers have freedom with responsibility, picking projects, chores and play that they find fun, rather than being assigned them by an adult.

What’s it like?  Life on the farm is “family style.”  We eat together, work together, play together.  Friendships build naturally, we learn to trust and be trustworthy, and to treat others as we would like to be treated.  Adults are mentors and guides facilitating discovery rather than umpires or policemen.

Chores and Projects, is it all work?  Nope!  In the daily schedule there’s far more time for play than work – structured or spontaneous, on the wide front lawn, with a new friend or favorite animal, in the hay-barn, on “hammock row,” in the woods, along the path, down by the ponds, there is fun-filled opportunity everywhere you look.  Of course, we sit and sing by the campfire, make things from nature, turn on the disco ball in the barn, and sometimes just watch the sunrise/sunset or gaze at the stars.

Any special considerations?  The routines of farm life is easily understood and often meets a child’s developmental needs.  However, we are not trained as a treatment or rehabilitation facility, nor are we staffed to provide one on one care.  We appreciate your kind consideration, and partnership in providing the right environment for your child, and those at camp.